Simon’s Legal Deliriant Guide

What is a deliriant?

 

Legal, natural deliriants are plants, or other naturally occurring substances that have very strong psychoactive effects – they cause delirium. In fact, they are the very plants that confute the popular belief that holds “what’s natural is always safe”. The plants in this category cannot be considered safe by any possible standards – in fact, most of them are poisonous and potentially deadly.

Deliriants, induce hallucinations – however, they constitute a different category from psychedelic and hallucinogenic plants as their effects differ greatly from the effects of herbs in the latter two categories.

Deliriant intoxications usually bear the following traits that distinguish them from the effects of other psychoactive substances:

  • extremely vivid, realistic and in most cases, dreadful hallucinations
  • the user does not know that he is hallucinating, instead perceives the hallucinations as perfectly normal reality
  • a state of total delirium – the user completely loses touch with reality and control over his own actions
  • a complete loss of memories from the period spent intoxicated
  • 24+ hour long trips and unpleasant after effects felt for several additional days (in the case of toxic nightshades, for instance, severely impaired vision)
  • the psychoactive effects of deliriants are often accompanied by rather unpleasant bodily symptoms, such as nausea, vomiting, loss of balance, inability to perspire and more

 

As you could probably figure out by now, these are not your everyday recreational herbal highs. Their use as recreational drugs is limited to a very narrow niche of die-hard psychonauts and unsuspecting, experimentally minded teens who often end up in a hospital after experiences with deliriants.

Be careful because, most of the plants that contain these extremely toxic compounds are widely cultivated for ornamental purposes. Moreover, nutmeg, which is also in this category, but is arguably much less potent than the nightshades, is a staple food item in most countries.

It probably won’t come as a surprise that I don’t advise anyone to try any of the plants that I will present in this article.

They are not fun, they are not recreational and some of them are potentially deadly. Be careful.

Summary:

 

The nightshades

 

The nightshades is the common name of the botanical family Solanaceae. The family contains over 98 genera of plants and over 2700 species. However, in this article I will only mention a few of the nightshades, the ones that contain the toxic tropane alkaloids that are responsible for their deliriant effects – scopolamine, hyoscyamine and atropine. Scopolamine is said to be the strongest of these compounds and also the one that’s found in the toxic nightshades in the highest concentration.

Nightshades with tropane alkaloid concentration include:

  • All plants in the Datura genus (Datura stramonium, Datura inoxia, Datura metel etc.)
  • All plants in the Brugmansia genus (Brugmansia suaveolens, Brugmansia sanguinea, Brugmansia arborea etc.)
  • All plants in the Mandragora genus (like Mandragora officinarum or mandrake) (more info coming soon)
  • The henbane (Hyoscyamus niger) plant (more info coming soon)
  • The belladonna, or deadly nightshade (Atropa belladonna) plant

.

Interesting fact about the nightshades: the so-called flying ointments of medieval witches reportedly contained a combination of Datura, Brugmansia and belladonna. The witches reportedly did not drink the potion but rubbed it on their skin (a portion of the tropane alkaloids are absorbed through the skin). These witches then disappeared for days (trip lasting for days is not unheard of using deliriants) and when they returned they talked about dancing with the devil, unholy rituals, flying brooms and speaking black cats. Our modern myth of the witches probably has roots in medieval deliriant trip reports.

A picture of a witch riding a broom. Scopolamine plant cocktails, so called witches' brew used by medieval witches reportedly contained a combination of toxic nightshades.
Datura, belladonna, and other nightshades were reportedly important ingredients of medieval witches’ potions.

 

 

Advices, precautions

 

An exclamation mark. It's meant to mark the importance of this section about precautions and dosage of potentially deadly, deliriant nightshades.
Be careful with the nightshades!

My first advice is very simple: avoid deliriants, especially the nightshades.

However, if you feel really devoted to the idea of trying datura, or some other similar “scopolamine plant”, here are some precautions that you must take:

Concerning the dosage:

Two very big problems come up, when calculating the requisite dosage of any nightshade:

  • they are almost only sold for ornamental purposes – there are no available extracts, or products meant for human consumption with pre-measured alkaloid content,
  • the effective dose is not much bigger, than the lethal dose.

These two factors make experimenting with nightshades potentially a game of Russian roulette. If you really want to try any of these herbs, always make sure to use the ladder method – carefully administer and gradually increase the dosage until you start feeling the effects.

The importance of having a trusted sober sitter:

Having a sober sitter is an absolute must, when taking nightshades. It has to be someone, who:

  • does not get scared easily, as you’ll probably do  and say some scary stuff,
  • possibly has some experience with altered states of consciousness herself,
  • whom you completely trust and tell before head what you’re gonna take and what can he expect,
  • the person needs to be able to stay up with you for 24+ hours, because at times, the trip can be quite long.

These precautions do not guarantee that you’ll be safe, only significantly decrease the chances of something horrible happening.

You should also check out my separate, detailed guides about Datura, Brugmansia and belladonna for more info on the dosage and precautions, as well as the legal status, effects and danger of these plants.

 

 

Deliriant plants in the Solanaceae family

 

Datura

A picture of Datura inoxia - a powerful deliriant plant in the nightshades family.
Datura inoxia – a powerful deliriant plant in the nightshades family

Datura is usually mentioned in singular form. However, it actually refers to a genus of several species of poisonous vespertine flowering plants belonging to the family Solanaceae, nightshades.

There is much confusion circling the Datura family of plants. There are many different species in the Datura genus. Probably the two most well-known are:

  • Datura inoxia (devil’s weed)
  • Datura stramonium (jimson weed or thorn apple)

One thing is for certain, though: all members of the Datura genus contain the highly toxic tropane alkaloids scopolamine, hyoscyamine, and atropine.


Datura is banned for human consumption in many countries around the world as well as some US states.

For more info on the legal status, effects and dangers of Datura, and some more tips on dosage and precautions, click here!

 

Datura trip report video

The following is a Youtube datura trip report video. This will show you what to expect from datura.


 

Belladonna

A picture of belladonna - a known scopolamine containing deliriant plant in the nightshades family.
Belladonna – a known deliriant

Belladonna is a perennial herb native to Europe, North Africa, Western Asia, some parts of Canada and the United States. It is also known as Atropa belladonna and deadly nightshade.

The plant’s less popular, somewhat folkloristic names are: devil’s berries, naughty man’s cherries, death cherries, beautiful death, and devil’s herb.

As you could probably guess from it’s denominations, it is a quite dangerous plant. In fact, Atropa belladonna is one of the most toxic plants of the Eastern Hemisphere and a deliriant. While it was widely embraced as a medicine in small amounts (nowadays only used in homeopathy), it is very dangerous and should always, no matter the intent of use, handled with extreme caution.

Like other nightshades, I do not recommend Atropa belladonna for recreational purposes.

 


Buy belladonna from the US here:

Buy live belladonna plants /only shipped inside the US, credit cards accepted – might be out of stock/


For more info on the legal status, effects, health benefits and dangers of belladonna, and some more tips on dosage and precautions, click here.

 


Brugmansia (angel’s trumpet)

A picture of Brugmansia sanguinea - a known deliriant "scopolamine plant".
Brugmansia sanguinea – a known deliriant “scopolamine plant”

Brugmansia is a genus of seven species of flowering plants in the family Solanaceae,  or nightshades. Their large, fragrant flowers gave them their common name: angel’s trumpet.

As many other species in the Solanaceae family, Brugmansia plants contain extremely toxic tropane alkaloids, such as scopolamine, hyoscyamine and atropine.

One of the most horrid of drug stories I’ve heard in my life is connected to Brugmansia abuse. A 2006 article published in the European Archives of Psychiatry and Neuroscience gave an account of an 18 year old German boy, who amputated his own penis and tongue under the influence of merely one cup of tea prepared from two angel’s trumpet blossoms.

Consumption of brugmansia is not advised.


Brugmansia is banned for human consumption in several countries and US states. 

For more info on the legal status, effects and dangers of Brugmansia pants, as well as tips dosage and precautions, check out my Brugmansia guide.


 


 

Nutmeg, Myristica fragrans

 

A picture of nutmeg - one of the most readily available "household deliriants".
Nutmeg – one of the most readily available “household deliriants”

In large doses, raw nutmeg has psychoactive effects, which are associated with one of its chemical components, myristicin – a recognised deliriant. This causes the so-called nutmeg high.

Even though it is one of the most readily available household highs in the world, it’s not widely used for recreational purposes. This is because to most people, the effects of nutmeg resemble poisoning more than an actual high.

On some occasions, nutmeg highs were said to have been at least partly positive experiences. However, in the vast majority of reported cases its effects are rather disturbing and very few people give nutmeg a second try.

Reported nutmeg poisonings are not great in numbers, but in some rare cases it can lead to hospitalisation, and in even more rare cases (one or two reported, in total) to death.


A picture of nutmeg seeds and powder - you need to powder the seeds yourself in order to maximise the deliriant effects.
Nutmeg seeds and powder

Still, if you want to try it, this is safer than the nightshades.

You can buy organic nutmeg ready for consumption from the US on this link

/credit cards accepted/

If you’re crazy enough to want to experience its unpleasant psychoactive effects, you need to obtain whole, organic (not ground) nutmeg (like what you can buy on the link above) and ground it yourself – as opposed to buying pre-packaged, ground nutmeg (very little to no effects).


For more info on the legal status, preparation, consumption, effects, danger and health benefits of nutmeg, check out my nutmeg high guide here!

 

 


 

Legal disclaimer:

do not advocate consumption of legal highs. They can have adverse side effects and if you are allergic, or if you overdose you might even die.

Some of them are poisonous plants – e.g.: nightshades- causing a dangerous state of delirium and should not be consumed under any circumstances.

If you are planning to consume any of the substances mentioned here consult your physician first and make sure you read about potential health effects and safe dosing.

Some of the information presented here might be outdated or incorrect (check “last updated” below). Make sure, that if you are planning to try out any of the substances to research them yourself as well.

I’m 100% committed to safe and responsible legal high consumption. If you have a few minutes to spare please read my blog post about responsible and safe legal drugs use

Back to Simon’s legal high guide.

 

Last updated: 2015.12.16.

Simon’s Brugmansia (Angel’s Trumpet) Guide

Brugmansia is a genus of seven species of flowering plants in the family Solanaceae, also called the “nightshades”. Their large, fragrant flowers give them their common name: angel’s trumpet. This name is sometimes also used for the species in the closely related genus, Datura. Members of the two genus are quite similar. The main difference is, that while Datura plants’ flowers are erect, Brugmansia flowers are pendulous.

Brugmansia species are originally native to the tropical regions of South America. However, nowadays they are grown as ornamental container plants worldwide and had been “naturalised” in tropical regions around the globe. Including: North America, Africa, Asia and Australia.

Brugmansia plants are large shrubs or small trees with woody trunks that usually have many branches (they’re also called tree Datura, for this reason). Their flowers usually have a strong, pleasant fragrance and they come in shades of white, yellow, pink, orange, green and red.

Species in the Brugmansia genus are the following:

  • Brugmansia arborea
  • Brugmansia aurea
  • Brugmansia insignis
  • Brugmansia sanguinea
  • Brugmansia suaveolens
  • Brugmansia versicolor
  • Brugmansia vulcanicola
A picture of Brugmansia suaveolens flowers. The plant is often called angel's trumpet. as well
Brugmansia suaveolens – angel’s trumpet

As all other species in the Solanaceae family, Brugmansia plants contain extremely toxic tropane alkaloids, such as scopolamine, hyoscyamine and atropine. These are reported to induce a total delirium and dreadful, realistic hallucinations at fairly small amounts consumed.

For this reason, only the most die-hard psychonauts experiment with teas brewed from the plant or parts of it eaten fresh. However, in all cases, they’re potentially gambling with their lives, as the alkaloid content of these plants vary greatly from specimen to specimen and the lethal dose is not much bigger than the “effective” dose.

Its not only the risk of a fatal overdose that makes this plant dangerous. Under the influence of these alkaloids, one completely loses touch with reality, which can result in, well, basically anything. A 2006 article published in the European Archives of Psychiatry and Neuroscience gave an account of an 18 year old German boy, who amputated his own penis and tongue under the influence of merely one cup of tea prepared from two angel’s trumpet blossoms.

Angel’s trumpet plants and nightshades in general are not to be trifled with! Datura and belladonna are in the same family – they should be avoided also!

I do not, by any means recommend using any species in the Brugmansia genus, or the Solanaceae family for recreational purposes!

 


 

Interesting facts about angel’s trumpet

The delirium and detachment from reality caused by the alkaloids (especially scopolamine) in Brugmansia and other nightshades are extremely strong. In fact, so strong that criminal elements in Columbia use scopolamine extracted from such plants to drug their victims. A victim interviewed in a documentary made by Vice.com said, that under the influence of the drug one is basically like a zombie or a little child. They follow the criminals who are giving them orders everywhere and willingly hand over their purses, wallets, apartment keys and basically anything to the robbers.

You can watch the Vice documentary below, its intriguing and scary at the same time:

 

For its potential for impairing free will, scopolamine was reportedly used as a “truth” serum in the first half of the 20th century by the CIA.

Source: CIA Historical Review Program – “Truth” Drugs in Interrogation


 

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Brugmansia guide

 

 

 

Brugmansia – legal status

 

Brugmansia species are widely grown as ornamental plants. However, there are some countries, that impose restrictions on their cultivation and use for human consumption.

The alkaloids in the nightshade plants, and the plants themselves are not really on the radar of drug authorities, as their effects are extremely unpleasant, which lowers their potential for abuse – people simply don’t want to take them – for a good reason.

Countries with available info on the legal status of Brugmansia species:

 Country legal status of brugmansia
UKBrugmansia doesn’t appear to be on the list of banned and restricted herbal ingredients, nor is scopolamine, atropine or hyoscyamine mentioned in the Misuse of Drugs Act schedules. It is not illegal to cultivate the plant for ornamental purposes.
USThere are no federal laws banning the cultivation of Brugmansia for ornamental purposes. However, Louisiana passed a law in 2005 that outlawed the cultivation and possession of 40 psychoactive plants, amongst them Brugmansia arborea.
CanadaThere don’t seem to be any restrictions in place on growing Brugmansia for ornamental purposes. Also, scopolamine, hyoscyamine and atropine doesn’t appear to be on the list of controlled substances in Canada.
AustraliaGrowing Brugmansia species for ornamental purposes doesn’t seem to be restricted in the Uniform Scheduling of Medicines and Poisons Act. However, importing and exporting seeds and parts of the plants is restricted under the Quarantine Legislation.
New ZealandGrowing Brugmansia species for ornamental purposes doesn’t seem to be restricted. Scopolamine, hyoscyamine and atropine are not on the list of controlled substances in the Misuse of Drugs Act of 1975.

 

 

Main active ingredients of Brugmansia

 

The main active ingredients in all species of the Brugmansia genus, and the nightshades family in general, are the tropane alkaloids: scopolamine, hyoscyamine and atropine. All three are reported to cause a bizarre delirium and hallucinations at fairly small dosages, and even death, when overdosed.

The structure of atropine, one of the active ingredients in Brugmansia plants.
Atropine – one of the active ingredients in Brugmansia plants

The structure of hyoscyamine - one of the psychoactive ingredients in Brugmansia plants.
Hyoscyamine is one of the active ingredients in Brugmansia
The structure of scopolamine - one of the active ingredients in angel's trumpet plants.
Scopolamine is one of the active ingredients in Brugmansia (angel’s trumpet)

 

 

The effects of Brugmansia

 

When intoxicated with angel’s trumpet, users can experience
hallucinations, motoric restlessness, over talkativeness, convulsive sobbing and sexual excitement, as well as aggressive and autoaggressive behaviour.

People also report a total loss of memories from the period spent under the influence of the alkaloids.

Somatic symptoms are tachycardia, mydriasis, hypertonia, respiratory disturbances and vomiting, as well as a potentially life-threatening anticholinergic syndrome.

The nature of the hallucinations under the influence of these alkaloids also make Brugmansia, and other species in the genus unfit for recreational purposes. They are usually vivid, realistic (to the point that the person experiencing them perceives them as perfectly normal reality) and also dreadful in the vast majority of the reported cases.

Source:

Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2006 Oct;256(7):458-9. Epub 2006 Jun 16. Self-amputation of penis and tongue after use of Angel’s Trumpet.

 

 

Dangers of Brugmansia

 

The dangers of Brugmansia and nightshades in general are almost too many to list here. 

On top of the disproportionately high risks of a fatal overdose, the alkaloids in the plant make the user completely lose touch with reality and enter a state of total delirium. All kinds of risky, accident-prone behaviour (and, as mentioned before, even self mutilation) are possible in this radically altered state of consciousness. The user is potentially dangerous to himself and his environment.

Arrests, hospitalisations and accidents are common under the influence of Brugmansia.

 

Brugmansia health benefits

 

In small doses, certain parts of the Brugmansia plant were and are used in traditional medicine in different cultures around the world.

Indigenous tribes in the Northern Peruvian Andes, for instance, use Brugmansia sanguinea externally to relieve pain, especially in cases of arthritic inflammations and cramps. They also use tinctures made from the plant to treat rheumatism and certain skin rashes.

Modern medicine also uses some of the active ingredients in angel’s trumpet and other similar plants from the Solanaceae family.

Scopolamine, the predominant alkaloid in the Brugmansia plants, for example, is used to treat the following conditions:

  • Motion sickness (used as a patch behind the ear)
  • Gastrointestinal spasms
  • Irritable bowel syndrome
  • Postoperative nausea, vomiting and sea sickness (leading to its use by scuba divers in the form of a transdermal patch)

Scopolamine is also used to widen the pupils for eye examination or eye surgery.

However, for all medical purposes, only extremely small amounts are used.

 

 

Brugmansia – dosage and precautions

 

As the German teen in the notorious penis and tongue amputation case reportedly brewed the deadly tea from a mere two blossoms, you should not even go near a dose that big.

Start at the absolute minimum and be sure to use the ladder method extremely carefully!  Thoroughly administer and gradually increase the dose, until you start feeling the effects. 

Also – it as an ABSOLUTE MUST to have a sober sitter staying up with you (for days if necessary, the trip can last quite long).

 

Angel’s trumpet trip reports

 

Brugmansia trip reports are dreadful and frightening to read. To get an idea about what the nightshades do to people, see some excerpts from trip reports available online:

 

“After consumption of the two leaves I was playing around on the computer, about half an hour, and strangely could hear the plant calling to me, through the walls of my room. She wanted me to eat more, a flower this time. My very last memories of this experience involve wandering around to the living room, and nibbling at least one flower from my plant. Evidence of the next morning would suggest that I’d eaten several. I remember dancing, spinning in circles around the room, and nibbling at the flowers. […]”

The next day:

“[…]My roommate filled me in on how I’d woken her in the middle of the night screaming, various articles of clothing were clogging the toilet, the bathtub was filled with puke, and apparently myself (I know, totally fear & loathing style). My poor roommate had to coax me out, naked except for a t-shirt, and while I was wandering mostly naked mumbling around the apartment she was on a completely uncalled for cleanup duty. It was about time for her to go to work, you see, and she kind of needed that shower asap, puke free. And the very last thing she needed was a roommate like me.”

Source: Erowid Trip Reports, Brugmansia – She Called to Me

 

“What did I do? For such a short question I received an extremely long and painful answer. ‘You pissed on my bedroom wall, my hallway wall, the bathroom wall, your pants, and just about anything else you could get your penis close to. You then proceeded to lay in my landlords bed, wet pants and all, got bored with that, went into the bathroom and ran a hot shower…never got in it, the water ran cold, moved back over to the toilet and attempted to shove multiple rolls of toilet paper down the ‘S’ bend, then sat in the bath talking gibberish to no one in particular. You were convinced that light is actually a form of sound that had re-wired itself into our hands and if you know how to drink it properly you’ll turn blue’ (she backed up this statement with a recording, it was undeniably my voice) this is when i started to realise that this really wasn’t a joke, and that my memory of the nights adventures and activities was completely unreliable. I had heard enough from Cindy, and felt sufficiently ashamed with my actions to shed a tear. I didn’t call my father, scared of the response I would receive.”

Source: Erowid Trip Reports, Brugmansia – I Must Be Crazy

 


 

If you find this Brugmansia guide useful please give it a “+1”:

Thank you! It helps my website a lot.

 

Share your own trip report in the comment section below (to ensure anonymity don’t use your real name or real email address when submitting trip reports)!

Some of the information presented here might be outdated or incorrect (check “last updated” below). Make sure, that if you are planning to try out any of the substances to research them yourself as well.

I’m 100% committed to safe and responsible legal high consumption. If you have a few minutes to spare please read my blog post about responsible and safe legal drugs use.

 

Brugmansia is only one of the legal highs included in Simon’s legal high guide, check out the others as well.

If you are only interested in legal deliriant, then check out Simon’s Legal Deliriant Guide for more (coming soon).

 

Last updated: 2015. 11. 24.

Simon’s Datura Guide

Datura is usually mentioned in singular form. However, it actually refers to a genus of several species of poisonous vespertine flowering plants belonging to the family Solanaceae, nightshades.

There is much confusion circling the Datura family of plants. There are many different species in the Datura genus. Probably the two most well-known are:

  • Datura inoxia (devil’s weed)
  • Datura stramonium (jimson weed or thorn apple)

One thing is for certain, though: all members of the Datura genus contain highly toxic tropane alkaloids, mainly scopolamine, hyoscyamine, and atropine.

The effects of these toxic substances include hallucinations and a delirious state, as the result of which they are sometimes used (although only by a small minority of hardcore “psychonauts”) as a recreational drug.

However, all deliriants, such as Datura inoxia, Datura stramonium, Datura metel etc. are extremely dangerous and there is a high risk of an unintentional fatal overdose, as the dose that triggers its psychoactive effects in not much smaller than the lethal dose.

Moreover, in most cases, the “trip” caused by the Datura plant is reported to be largely negative. For most people, it is downright disturbing and often described as a state of total delirium, with vivid hallucinations, loss of memory and self control and unpleasant bodily symptoms.

Datura plants are very dangerous, I do not recommend the recreational use of any species of the genus.

 


 

Interesting facts about Datura:

 

In many indigenous American cultures certain species of the Datura genus (Datura inoxia, Datura stramonium, Datura wrightii etc.) were regarded as sacred plants for their hallucinogenic properties. Some examples are:

  • The Aztecs allegedly gave Datura preparations to their sacrificial victims in order to prepare them for death.
  • The Algonquin Indians gave it to adolescent boys during a rite of passage between childhood to adulthood.
  • The Chumash Indians thought, that by taking Datura, they come in touch with their “dream helper”, that guides them through the rest of their lives. Those who sought to strengthen their bond with this entity later on in their lives, took the substance on additional occasions.

Datura, along with Atropa belladonna (deadly nightshade), Hyoscyamus niger (henbane) and Mandragora officinarum (mandrake) was one of the plants reportedly used by medieval witches. The common belief held, that these ointments made witches fly.

 

Sources:

Drugs Across the Spectrum by Raymond Goldberg

The Datura Cult Among the Chumash

Why Do Witches Ride Broomsticks? Hallucinogens (Forbes)

 


 

If you find this Datura guide useful please give it a “+1”:

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Datura guide

 

 

 

Datura – legal status

 

Datura is a wild growing plant, therefore it is rather hard to ban. However, many governments are reported to impose restrictions on possessing, cultivating, importing or growing it with the intent of consumption.

Countries with available information regarding the legal status of Datura:

 

Datura – Legal status
Countrylegal status
AustraliaSome species, Datura stramonium,
Darura spp. and Datura tatula are
controlled under the Standard for the
Uniform Scheduling of Medicines and Poisons Act
BrazilOnly Datura suaveolens is controlled
Canada
Neither datura nor scopolamine (its main active
ingredient) are scheduled
substances in Canada
New Zealandappears to be uncontrolled
Norwaylegal
UKlegal

 

 

There are no federal laws in the US that would outlaw Datura. However, there are some states, that have restrictions in place on the plant. Most states’ regulations only mention Datura stramonium (jimson weed) See the table below:

 

Datura – Legal status – USA
statelegal status
ConnecticutDatura stramonium is listed amongst
“Restricted drugs or substances”, Chapter 420b
KansasDatura stramonium is a Schedule I drug
LouisianaLouisiana Act No 159 makes 40 plants
illegal, including Datura spp., when intended
for human consumption
NevadaAll parts of the plant are on the list
of controlled substances
New JerseyOnly legal for medical uses, only on prescription
OklahomaAs a result of a poisoning cases in 2004,
authorities added “naturally occurring”
to the definition of “synthetic controlled substances”,
and outlawed Datura
Tennesseelegal, the state did not pass the bill in 2006,
that planned to ban Datura and many other plants,
instead they merely banned Salvia divinorum

 

 

 

Buy Datura

 

Datura is a wild growing plant. It can also be purchased from plant shops, but its availability is dependent on the country’s laws.

However, it is not recommended for recreational use. 

 

 

Buy Datura US

 

I cannot currently recommend any places to buy Datura in the US.

 

 

Buy Datura – Netherlands

 

I cannot currently recommend any paces to buy Datura in the Netherlands.


 

 

Main active ingredients of Datura

 

The main active ingredients in all members of the Datura genus are scopolamine, hyoscyamine and atropine. All three are tropane alkaloids, that are reported to cause a bizarre delirium and hallucinations, even at fairly small dosages.

 

The structure of atropine - a toxic tropane alkaloid in all species of the Datura genus (Datura inoxia, Datura stramonium etc.).
Atropine – a toxic tropane alkaloid in Datura

The structure of scopolamine - a toxic tropane alkaloid in all species of the Datura genus (Datura inoxia, Datura stramonium etc.).
Scopolamine – a psychoactive ingredient of Datura
The structure of hyoscyamine - one of the active ingredients in all species of the Datura genus (Datura inoxia, Datura stramonium etc.).
Hyoscyamine – an active ingredient in Datura

 

All parts of every species of the Datura genus contain these toxic compounds, but the concentration is reported to be the highest in the seeds.

 

 

The effects of the Datura

 

The main effects of datura are delirium, extreme disorientation, and realistic hallucinations.

 

Additional effects can include:

 

  • No memories for periods of several hours
  • Irrational behaviour
  • Blurred vision/inability to focus the eyes (lasting up to several days)
  • Dryness of mouth
  • Rapid ood swings, most often alteration between excitement and sedation
  • Inhibited digestion
  • Inability to perspire

 

The Datura trip:

 

Onset – When taken orally, the effects can begin in 20-30 minutes, but may take as long as 2-3 hours to be noticeable, depending on dose. When smoked, effects may begin in as quickly as 5 minutes.

 

Duration – A moderate datura dose lasts 8-12 hours, while strong doses can cause effects lasting for 2-3 days.

 

Visual Effects – Unlike the visual effects frequently reported with psychedelics such as LSD and psilocybin-containing mushrooms, datura causes 100% realistic, open-eyed visual and auditory hallucinations, the person cannot distinguish between the hallucinations and reality. Elaborate visions and fantasies are common, sometimes including long conversations with imaginary persons. Smoking phantom cigarettes is often reported, even by non-smokers.

Source: Erowid Datura Basics

 

 

Dangers of Datura

 

Datura, as all other deliriants, is extremely dangerous. The main problem with these plants and all members of the Datura genus alike, (Datura inoxia, Datura metel, Datura starmonium etc.) is that the lethal dose is very close to the effective dose.

Moreover, the overwhelming majority of datura users describe their experience as very unpleasant and often physically dangerous. There are many reports of serious injuries and arrests, hospitalization resulting from Datura intoxication.

Taking Datura, in all cases, means putting your life at risk to some extent.

Fatal Datura poisoning cases are not unheard of. Several official and unofficial sources talk about cases, where experimentally minded teenagers died from Datura poisoning, after drinking “Datura tea” or eating the seeds, flowers or leaves of the plant.

There was also at least one reported occasion, when a person drowned under the influence of the substance, due to heavy incoordination issues and blackout-like state caused by the plant.

Even with non-lethal doses, Datura poisoning can get you hospitalised or in coma. Excessive use can have long lasting ill effects on the brain and liver as well.

Sources:

Fatal poisoning from ingestion of Datura stramonium seeds

Datura poisoning-the Angel’s Trumpet

Erowid: Datura Basics

 

 

Datura health benefits

 

Datura has plenty of pharmacological uses. It is reported to treat or alleviate many medical conditions. The primary biologically active substances in Datura are the alkaloids atropine and scopolamine.

Datura extracts are known to be used or had been used to treat or alleviate the following medical conditions:

  • Parkinson’s disease,
  • peptic ulcers,
  • diarrhea,
  • bronchial asthma,
  • hemorrhoids,
  • burns, inflammations,
  • mental diseases, like depression and schizophrenia,
  • abscesses, wounds,
  • rheumatism,
  • falling hair.

Parts of the Datura plant are being and had been used in traditional, folk and Ayurvedic medicine as well.

 

 

Datura – consumption, preparation

 

People who take Datura for its psychoactive effects usually simply eat parts of the live plant. The seeds are the most commonly ingested parts of the plant.

The amount of active ingredients contained in a specimen can vary greatly in the case of any plant. This is especially problematic in the case of any plants in the Datura genus, as the lethal dose is not much bigger than the effective dose.

I couldn’t unearth any valid info on the generally accepted dosage, probably for the above reasons. Reading the trip reports, I encountered very strong and long lasting trips caused by as few as 10 seeds taken, orally.

That being said, one general rule I found reoccurring, which should be taken very seriously:

In the case of Datura, you should always thoroughly administer and very gradually increase the dosage, until you can feel its effect. In other words, use the ladder method!

As it is and extremely dangerous substance, you should always follow the rules below:

  • Do not take datura without a sober sitter.
  • Do not operate heavy machinery. Do not drive.
  • Do not swim. Avoid bodies of water.
  • Do not take datura in situations that may require you to be responsible for yourself or anyone else, or to be able to answer simple questions about who you are and what you are doing.

The main effects of datura are, as mentioned above, delirium, extreme disorientation, and realistic hallucinations.

 

 

Buy Datura

 

Datura is a wild growing plant. It can also be purchased from plant shops, but its availability is dependent on the country’s laws.

 

 

Buy Datura – US

 

Currently, I cannot recommend any shops to buy Datura in the US.

 

Buy Datura – Netherlands

 

Currently, I cannot recommend any shops to buy Datura in the Netherlands.

 

 

Datura trip reports

 

Almost every Datura trip report out there ends with a “this is not for everyone” disclaimer, and for a good reason.

Datura is not fun, it is not for people looking for a good time. Most experiences are very dangerous and include a complete loss of touch with reality with hallucinations ranging from just strange to downright dreadful.

I highlighted some excerpts from trip reports posted on Erowid.org, that I felt, sum up the “Datura experience” quite well:

“The entire house is dead silent. Then I hear the tv go back on, but the screen is blank, and I hear Steve saying ‘hey I’m over here’. I realize that he’s calling me from out in my backyard, so I put my shoes on and go outside. At first I scanned my back yard for him, but couldn’t see him, and I couldn’t hear him anymore. I suddenly get the idea that Steve had come over for a hide and seek game (at this point I have absolutely no idea that I have taken anything) so I run into the yard looking around for him. Then I speak ‘come out come out where ever you are’ . Right when I say this my voice sounds very different, like a person who has gone totally insane. This starts to scare me very much, and Steve is nowhere to be found. I look way across to the other end of my yard (my yard is only about a 100 foot by 200 foot area, but now it was a soccer field size) and at the other end I see my dog’s pen, a fenced in area in the corner with all my friends who are straight edge that stopped being friends with me when I started smoking pot. I haven’t seen them in so long, so I run towards the pen. They look just as happy to see me as I am to see them, and they let me into the pen. We start talking and to my surprise, one of them pulls a blunt out of nowhere and sparks it. I am naturally amused but shocked, then they start to explain to me that they came to see me cause they all ‘got into the game’ and don’t think drugs are that bad after all. On the outside I am pleased to hear this, but on the inside I begin to get feelings of untrust. These bastards abandoned me years back. I don’t show any unpleasant feelings on the outside, and I continue to be cheery with them, although I keep a state of mind not to trust anyone there. […]

Next thing I know I’m back in my kitchen lying on the floor very sweaty, Steve is there sitting on the kitchen counter. My focus is very blurred and ‘off’ and I feel very confused about why he’s there on the counter and I’m on the floor, but every few moments I kinda snap back into reality and know exactly what going on, then snap back into delirium and totally forget everything.”

Source: Erowid Datura Trip Report: Truely The Devils Weed

 

“Next thing I know I whip out a cigarette that I distinctly remember leaving behind my ear. I begin a quest in search for a lighter. I continuously search over and over the same square feet of carpet in front of me for a lighter but I don’t find one. Magically I realise that my cigarette is already lit. “Duh!” I think to myself, and begin smoking it. Moments later it falls on the floor and I start searching for it, but it’s gone. Wtf? WHAT THE FUCK? Take a wild guess what I do next? I reach behind the same ear and find another one; however this doesn’t seem to strike me as slightest bit unusual. I just go on smoking it. Oh.. of course- without a lighting it first.

Another blackout happens. A fraction of my memory is erased, and I find myself naked in bed, hiding under my cover sheets. “I” is telling me to put on my clothes, but I just tell him to fuck off and began to feel the incessant and irrevocable pain growing inside my body. I still have no idea till this day how to describe the pain, or have I ever recalled feeling the same way on any other substance except for high doses of dimemhydrinate.

Right about that time, Kim (being sober) decided to call the ambulance for we had all become a bit like a bunch of zombies, with slightly worse motor function skills. The whole lot of us were stumbling around and crashing into everything. I do not recall any of this; but apparently there were two ambulances that arrived outside our house. 3 of us were put in one, and B and C hopped in the other one, or rather, were forced. I refused to get into the ambulance apparently, and kept dropping my shorts that were loosely bound to my waste.”

Source: Erowid Datura Trip Report: Delerium in Perdition

 


 

If you find this Datura guide useful please give it a “+1”:

Thank you! It helps my website a lot.

 

Share your own trip report in the comment section below (to ensure anonymity don’t use your real name or real email address when submitting trip reports)!

Some of the information presented here might be outdated or incorrect (check “last updated” below). Make sure, that if you are planning to try out any of the substances to research them yourself as well.

I’m 100% committed to safe and responsible legal high consumption. If you have a few minutes to spare please read my blog post about responsible and safe legal drugs use.

 

Datura is only one of the legal highs included in Simon’s legal high guide, check out the others as well.

If you are only interested in legal deliriant, then check out Simon’s Legal Deliriant Guide for more (coming soon).

 

Last updated: 2015. 11. 16.

Simon’s Atropa Belladonna (Deadly Nightshade) Guide

Belladonna is a perennial herb native to Europe, North Africa, Western Asia, some parts of Canada and the United States. It is also known as Atropa belladonna and deadly nightshade. It got the first half of its name after being used as a cosmetic in renaissance Italy, and the second half after the greek mythological figure, Atropos. He was one of the three gods of fate and destiny, who held the shears to cut the threads of human lives.

The plant’s less popular, somewhat folkloristic names are: devil’s berries, naughty man’s cherries, death cherries, beautiful death, and devil’s herb.

As you could probably guess from it’s denominations, it is a quite dangerous plant. In fact, Atropa belladonna is one of the most toxic plants of the Eastern Hemisphere. While it was and is widely embraced as a medicine in small amounts (it is used mostly in homeopathy nowadays), it is very dangerous and should always, no matter the intent of use, handled with extreme caution.

And I really mean EXTREME CAUTION. Belladonna can kill you, or cause really bad trips you’ll never forget for the rest of your life.

I do not recommend Atropa belladonna for recreational use at all.

There are plenty of much better options out there

 


 

Interesting facts about Belladonna:

Atropa belladonna has a long history of use as a medicine, cosmetic, and poison.

Medical uses: it was reportedly used as a sedative and anaesthetic for surgeries before the middle ages. One of the active components in Atropa belladonna, scopolamine was used as an ingredient for the so-called “Twilight Sleep” drug, which was used as a painkiller for childbirth pains in the early 20th century.

Uses in cosmetics: the plant in fact, received its name “belladonna”, which means beautiful women, because in renaissance Italy, women used to drip small drops of the plant’s extract into their eyes, to enlarge their pupils. Large pupils were considered sexual symbols at the time. However, its side effects were unpleasant (blurred vision, dizziness), and the practice was even associated with blindness.

Uses as a poison: as said before, belladonna is an extremely poisonous plant, and it was used for its properties as such in many instances through history. Ancient romans allegedly made poison arrows using an extract from the plant. It was also a popular choice of assassins through the middle ages.

Belladonna was also reportedly one of the ingredients of the so-called Flying ointment used by witches in the middle ages, which allegedly made their brooms fly (in reality, probably only made witches really high).

Sources:

Labor Dispute: The Medical and Social Response to the Pain of Childbirth From 1800 to the Present (NY Times)

Belladonna, broomsticks and brain chemistry

The Penn State Medieval Garden: Deadly Nightshade

 


 

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Belladonna guide

 

 

 

Belladonna – legal status

 

Belladonna appears to be legal in almost every country, as it is a wild plant and a some of its components are used in herbal and traditional medicine, as well as homeopathy all over the world.

One US state, however, is reported to have banned Atropa belladonna for human consumption. Signed into law June 28, 2005, Louisiana State Act No 159, outlawed the cultivation, possession or sale of 40 known hallucinogenic plants, with Atropa belladonna being one of them.

Source: 2006 Louisiana Laws – RS 40:989.1 — Unlawful production, manufacture, distribution, or possession of hallucinogenic plants

 

 

Buy belladonna

 

It is available worldwide, however, I can not recommend any shops in specific, that ship outside the US.

 

 

Buy belladonna – US

 

For more information about belladonna and to buy belladonna plant or belladonna extract in the US go here:

Buy belladonna plant and belladonna extract – Shipped from US, credit cards are accepted.

 

 

Buy belladonna – Netherlands

 

I haven’t found any European store which would sell Belladonna. You might want to try something else or order it from the US.

 


 

 

Main active ingredients in Belladonna

 

The main active ingredients in Atropa belladonna are scopolamine and hyoscyamine. Both are tropane alkaloids, that are reported to cause a bizarre delirium and hallucinations, even if only a fairly small amount was consumed.

 

The structure of the scopolamine compound - a toxic alkaloid with hallucinogenic properties found in belladonna, or deadly nightshade.
Scopolamine – one of the active ingredients of belladonna

The structure of the hyoscyamine compound - one of the psychoactive ingredients in Atropa belladonna, or deadly nightshade.
Hyoscyamine – a psychoactive ingredient in Atropa belladonna

 

All parts of the belladonna plant contain the toxic alkaloids. However, the concentration is said to be the strongest in the roots of the plant. The actual amount, though, might vary from specimen to specimen.

 

 

The effects of Atropa belladonna

 

The psychedelic effects of Atropa belladonna are reported to be strong, to the point of completely losing touch with reality. It causes a full blown, bizarre delirium and vivid open eye hallucinations, that are perceived as completely normal reality under the influence of the substance. Some trip reports mention complete loss of control over actions and thoughts and a total loss of memory for some parts of the experience (sometimes, this can mean days).

It is reportedly much stronger than LSD, but totally lacking the insightfulness of psychedelic experiences (one “psychonaut” described it as the mix of LSD and a total blackout-drunk state). It entails disorientation and a total loss of self-awareness.

Belladonna is also quite heavy on the body. Its bodily symptoms can involve:

  • vomiting
  • sweating
  • high temperature
  • increased heart rate
  • extreme dry mouth

 

 

Dangers of deadly nightshade

 

The first and major danger of belladonna is the greatest of all dangers:

There is a high risk of an unintentional fatal overdose.

Also, the trip can be an extremely unpleasant and can last for days. Individuals under the influence of the substance are at great risk of all kinds of accidents, because of the extreme disorientation, confusion and muscular incoordination.

 

 

Belladonna health benefits

 

Belladonna – or at least some of the chemicals found in the plant – is used in modern medicine and homeopathy as well.

In traditional medicine and homeopathy, belladonna, in some form, said to cure or alleviate the following conditions:

  • Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Although, early research suggests that taking belladonna along with the drug phenobarbital by mouth for one month does not improve symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome
  • Asthma
  • Whooping cough
  • Colds
  • Hay fever
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Motion sickness
  • Arthritis-like pain
  • Nerve problems
  • Hemorrhoids
  • Spasms and colic-like pain in the stomach and bile ducts

However, there is insufficient evidence for the effectiveness of the plant in treating these conditions. (Moreover, homeopathy in general is not effective. Homeopathic remedies were actually recently banned from pharmacies in many European countries, because they are not actual medicines (placebo at best) and have no actual medicinal value.)

Source: WebMD – Belladonna

 

 

Atropa belladonna – consumption and preparation

 

All parts of the belladonna plant contain the toxic alkaloids, so they can all induce the effects. There is not really a generally accepted method for consumption, but reports include eating its berries or seeds, as well as making a tea of its leaves.

It’s best to avoid belladonna all together. However, if you still feel like experimenting, skip to the “Dosage” part of this guide and read my suggestions there carefully, no matter which method you choose.

The amount of active ingredients contained in a specimen can vary greatly in the case of any plant. This is especially problematic in the case of the belladonna plant, as the lethal dose is not much bigger than the effective dose.

I couldn’t unearth any valid info on the generally accepted dosage of belladonna, probably for the above reasons. That being said, you should always thoroughly administer and very gradually increase the dosage, until you reach the threshold and it takes effect. In other words, use the ladder method!

 

One precaution you should definitely take, is to have at least one sober friend with you when you expect the experience to kick in (a so called “tripsitter”), as you will probably not be able to manage even simple tasks and will probably pose dangers to yourself and others. 

 

 

 

Buy Belladonna

 

It is available worldwide. However, I can not recommend any shops in specific, that ship outside the US.

 

Buy Belladonna – US

 

For more information about belladonna and to buy belladonna plant or belladonna extract in the US go here:

Buy belladonna plant and belladonna extract /shipped from US, credit cards are accepted/

 

Buy Belladonna – Netherlands

 

I haven’t found any Dutch store which would sell Belladonna. You might want to try something else or order it from the US.

 

 

 

Belladonna trip reports

 

Atropa belladonna trip reports are sure amongst the most interesting and least tempting. I read all of them on Erowid.com and came to the conclusion, that this is not something I would risk trying. Here are some excerpts:

“T1:45 – At this point I lost all concepts of what was reality and what was a hallucination, but I will try my best to portray what exactly was going on with my body. Because I had been drinking so much water, I really needed to relieve myself, but simply getting out of my chair proved to be a somewhat impossible task. It took all the strength in my body to lift myself from the chair, and after I stood up I collapsed onto the floor, beginning to drag myself to the toilet. Once there, I became fully aware of how powerful this plant is. Inside the toilet bowl were millions of black dots scurrying all around, it actually became an entertaining game to try and knock them into the water with my urine, however, to my dismay, when I woke up the next day I found out that I didn’t even pee in the toilet, just all around it.

T?? – This is where my memory of the night stops, and I completely submitted to the plant. I only have bits and pieces of my own memory, and my sober friend tried to fill me in on what happened. The hallucinations became extremely realistic at this point. Audio distortion was very heavy, and the visual distortion was to the point where I could not read anything. One thing I noticed was that the visual blur only affected letters/numbers, whereas the rest of the world retained (I use that word loosely) its normality. My brain became mush, and a powerful, powerful state of confusion washed over me, making mundane tasks such as getting more water almost impossible. I remember walking around my dorm thinking I was naked, and there were at least 10 people in every room. I didn’t know any of them, but I was able to talk to quite a few of them. They seemed to ignore my nudity, and I understood this to be a sign of friendship. In my room there were 4 people I’ve never seen before, my little brother, and a hallucinated version of my sober friend (who at the time was actually trying to help the other guy was tripping off the floor). We all talked for what seemed like years, discussing many things from the roman empire to how butterscotch was made.”

Source: Erowid belladonna trip report: Entering Insanity

 

I started to watch a little TV, when suddenly I saw a picture of my dad and my mom and my sister all on the TV. They were all saying things, and just as soon as it started, my mom came out of the TV and started yelling at me. I was pretty confused at this point. BAM! I’m downstairs for some reason, my pants are gone, and someone is shaking me. It’s my cousin, telling me to come show her how to play guitar. I get up, put some pants on, and go into the guitar room. I turn on the AMP, and let her play a little. She played pretty good, I walked into my own room, and sat down on my bed. A girl walked by my door, and as the light from my room shined on her, she faded away, but as soon as she got into the shadows again, she came into existence. Many other things happened, but not in any order I can remember very clearly.

The time I took the Tea was about 5:50pm, the time I went to sleep was about 6am. I was talking to myself for about 12 hours. And the whole time I was convinced I was not imagining things. Everything was too realistic. Those cookies I mentioned earlier, well, I found them, exactly where I had hid them. My cousin playing guitar? she never came over last night. People waiting in line for my shower? Yeah right.

I thought I had lost the belladonna, when I found it in my dad’s closet. I don’t remember putting it in there, but I must have. Its as if, part of me was awake, while the other part was sleepwalking. One half of me was constantly setting up the next sequence of events, while the other half was living them out one step at a time. “

Source: Erowid belladonna trip report: Wandering Delirium

 


 

If you find this belladonna guide useful please give it a “+1”:

Thank you! It helps my website a lot.

 

Share your own trip report in the comment section below (to ensure anonymity don’t use your real name or real email address when submitting trip reports)!

Some of the information presented here might be outdated or incorrect (check “last updated” below). Make sure, that if you are planning to try out any of the substances to research them yourself as well.

I’m 100% committed to safe and responsible legal high consumption. If you have a few minutes to spare please read my blog post about responsible and safe legal drugs use.

 

Belladonna is only one of the legal highs included in Simon’s legal high guide, check out the others as well.

If you are only interested in legal deliriant, then check out Simon’s Legal Deliriant Guide for more (coming soon).

Last updated: 2015. 11. 13.

Simon’s Nutmeg (High) Guide

When people think about nutmeg (Myristica fragrans), usually Christmas dishes and other home baked sweets come to mind. Not many know, that it has intoxicating properties. Nutmeg is in fact a deliriant, and although cases of its use are not common, it is recognised by toxicologists as one of the more interesting spices in the kitchen.

To most people, the effects of nutmeg resemble poisoning more than an actual high.

Nutmeg is a popular for its culinary uses. However, it is also cultivated, albeit less widely, for its psychoactive properties.

The spice we call nutmeg is derived from the Myristica fragrans, an evergreen tree native to the Banda Islands in the Moluccas, Indonesia.
It is also cultivated on Penang Island in Malaysia, in the Caribbean, especially in Grenada, and in Kerala, a state in southern India.

Another popular kind of spice, mace also comes from the Myristica fragrans tree. Nutmeg is the seed of the tree, while mace is the dried “lacy” reddish covering or aril of the seed.

They both have the psychoactive ingredient, myristicin which is responsible for nutmeg’s mind-altering effects.

On the picture, there is a Myristica fragrans tree.
Nutmeg, Myristica fragrans tree

 


 

Interesting facts about nutmeg:

Numerous influential figures reportedly experienced with the nutmeg high in different contexts. The examples include:

The famous equal rights activist Malcolm X – he writes in his autobiography, that when in prison in 1946, prior to his conversion to Islam, he was introduced to the psychoactive effects of nutmeg by his cellmate in the Charlestown prison. He recalls: “I first got high in Charlestown on nutmeg. My cellmate … bought from kitchen worker inmates penny matchboxes full of stolen nutmeg … stirred into a glass of cold water, a penny matchbox full of nutmeg had the kick of three or four reefers.”

Renowned writer and “psychonaut” William S. Burroughs reported in his famous Letter From A Master Addict To Dangerous Drugs, published in the British Journal of Addiction in 1956, to have taken nutmeg once. It is in fact probably the only psychoactive substance that he tried only once.

Legendary Jazz Saxophonist Richard “Bird” Parker and his band were regularly experimenting with getting high on nutmeg –  Richard Rudgley reports in his Encyclopedia of Psychoactive Substances. It was a cheap and legal high at the time (and still is).
The band usually took it with milk or Coca Cola.

 

Sources:

Hallucinogenic foods (The Guardian)

Letter From A Master Addict To Dangerous Drugs (William S. Burroughs)

 


 

If you find this nutmeg guide useful please give it a “+1”:

Thank you! It helps my website a lot.

 


 

Nutmeg guide

 

 

 

Nutmeg – legal status

 

Nutmeg is legal in every country in the world, except for Saudi Arabia, where it is recognised as “haram” for its psychoactive properties. However, even there, there’s no full-blown ban on it, but the country does have restrictions on importing nutmeg in place. It can be only shipped into the country mixed with other spices, and the mix can only contain as much as 20% of the seed.

Moreover, in 2011 the Fatwa (Islamic edict) Centre at the General Authority for Islamic Affairs and Endowments in Abu Dhabi issued an edict in response to a question by an Emirati woman through its website – Alkhaleej daily reported. She was concerned, whether using nutmeg in the kitchen was irreconcilable with the teachings of Islam. The authority’s response was, that although there is nothing wrong with using it as a spice in small amounts, “it is better and religiously safer to avoid using nutmeg altogether”.

 

Sources:

The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Import Guide No 01: Banned and restricted products

Muslims urged to avoid nutmeg in food (Emirates News 24/7)

 

 

Buy nutmeg

 

The local grocery store could do the trick. However, there is an entheogen shop that sells special nutmeg made just for people to get high on.

It is said that this variety contains more of the active ingredient (myristicin) than what’s found at grocery stores.

You can buy nutmeg here:

Buy nutmeg /shipped from the US/

/Don’t forget, freshly ground nutmeg works the best. Even if you buy yours at a grocery store, don’t buy pre-ground nutmeg./

 


 

 

Main active ingredient

 

The myristicin compound - the psychoactive ingredient of Nutmeg, Myristica fragrans
Nutmeg, Myristica fragrans psychoactive ingredient

The main active ingredient of nutmeg, responsible for the nutmeg high is myristicin.

It is a strong deliriant an anticholinergic.

 

 

The effects of nutmeg – the “nutmeg high”

 

In large doses, raw nutmeg has psychoactive effects, which are associated with one of its chemical components, myristicin – a recognised deliriant. This causes the so-called nutmeg high.

However,  the effects are usually unpleasant and are, in most cases accompanied by nausea, headaches and a heavy body load.

Effects of nutmeg can include:

  • excited and confused state of mind
  • headaches
  • nausea
  • dizziness
  • dry mouth
  • bloodshot eyes
  • memory disturbances
  • hallucinations (reportedly rather unpleasant ones, such as visual distortions and paranoid ideations)

On some occasions, nutmeg highs were said to have been at least partly positive experiences. However, in the vast majority of reported cases its effects are rather disturbing and very few people give nutmeg a second try.

 

 

Dangers of Nutmeg

 

Nutmeg poisonings are relatively rare. Toxicologists say, that most cases reported are the result of a child sampling a spice jar left open somewhere in the kitchen or experimentally minded youngsters between the age of 15 and 20 getting high on nutmeg.

Source: A Warning on nutmeg (New York Times) 

 

Nutmeg poisoning can also lead to hospitalisation, depending on the weight and overall health of the individual taking nutmeg, as well as the amount and the form in which it is consumed.

The toxic dose of nutmeg is reported to be 2-3 tablespoons. Dangers of nutmeg poisoning, apart from the the majority of reported experiences under nutmeg being bad, or semi-bad trips are:

  • liver damage,
  • tachycardia,
  • vomiting,
  • convulsion,
  • even death, although there are very few reported cases.

There has been at least one reported case of deadly nutmeg poisoning. In 2001, an 55 year old woman was said to have died because of myristicin poisoning.

Source: Nutmeg (myristicin) poisoning–report on a fatal case and a series of cases recorded by a poison information centre

 

Also, myristicin poisoning is potentially deadly to some pets and livestock, and may be caused by culinary quantities of nutmeg harmless to humans. For this reason it is recommended not to feed eggnog to dogs.

 

 

Nutmeg health benefits

 

Nutmeg, when consumed in non-toxic doses has plenty of health benefits. The most commonly recognised are:

Improves digestive health – Nutmeg, in powder form retains its fibre content, therefore helps the digestive system by promoting peristaltic motions of the intestinal muscles.

Improves oral health – Nutmeg has plenty of antibacterial components which can improve oral hygiene by killing bacterias, such as the ones that cause halitosis. It also generally boosts the immunity of your gums and teeth.

Helps insomnia – Traditionally, nutmeg was – amongst many other things – a folk-remedy for sleeplessness. Nutmeg has a high content of magnesium, an essential mineral in the body that reduces nerve tension, and even stimulates the release of serotonin which creates a feeling of relaxation or sedation.

Blood circulations and kidney problems – Nutmeg is also said to improve blood circulation in general, and remedy kidney infections.

 

 

Nutmeg tea and extract – methods of consumption, preparation

 

Nutmeg is reported to be a rather unpleasant legal high and is mostly used by people who can’t afford better or want to experiment with something new (most people don’t give it a second try, though).

However, if your really feel devoted to trying it, at least do it the right way.  The most common way is to prepare a nutmeg tea.

“Grind 6 nutmeg nuts (approx. 30g or 1 ounce) into a powder. I use a coffee grinder. If you don’t have strainer just break the nuts into large chunks using a mortal & pestle. I recommend grinding.

Now chuck this into 750 ml of water (3 cups) and simmer without boiling over a stove for 1 hour. The water will be reduced by about 30% so your end result will be approx. 500 ml of tea.

After the one hour strain the nutmeg out and let the tea cool. Then sweeten w/ honey (play around with this to see what you like best) and drink.

Note: **IMPORTANT** Do not cool the tea down to where it is noticeably cold (test it with your finger). If it is noticeably cold, and there is a white precipitate on the sides of your cup re-heat the tea and re-dissolve the white precipitate. You will only get minimal effects if you don’t pay attention to this.

Sources: Getting nutmeg is very easy, but getting it cost effectively might be a bit trickier. Get only whole nutmeg, don’t waste your time with the pre-ground stuff. If you get your nutmeg at the supermarket it will probably be about $5 / 1.5 oz. This is ok I guess, but if you search out your local herb stores you can find prices (at least in my area) that are about $1/ oz.

Effects: They begin within 15 minutes and last (estimated) 3 or 4 hours. It is very similar to cannabis.”

Source: Nutmeg Tea and Drink Recipes on Erowind.org – they have a few more recipes, if you want to check them out!

My method is much simpler. The problem when consuming nutmeg in quantities required to get high is the extremely bad taste. So, what I recommend is to buy baker’s yeast (very cheap, and healthy, plenty of B vitamins) and encase the nutmeg within little yeast balls and swallow them. You can put them in pills, capsules as well if you happen to have a capsule maker at home.

 

My own encounter with nutmeg was a rather unpleasant one (extremely unpleasant, in fact). Therefore I can only cite experiences of others, who claim to have had a nice (or at least tolerable) high on the tea prepared from the spice. Many reported an effect very similar to that of cannabis.

 

The above recipe contains tips for the dosage too. However, on forums and blogs, other recipes sometimes include a smaller amount. It is probably wiser to start with a smaller dose than 6 nuts.

 

 

Buy Nutmeg

The local grocery store could do the trick. However, there is an entheogen shop that sells special nutmeg made just for people to get high on.

It is said that this variety contains more of the active ingredient (myristicin) than what’s found at grocery stores.

You can buy nutmeg here:

Buy nutmeg /shipped from the US/

 

 

 

Nutmeg trip reports

 

Most of the trip reports out there talk about an experience that is more weird and interesting than pleasant. Also, in almost all cases, a strong hangover, lasting multiple days is reported.

“The Experience – Well I started feeling rather wacky… spacey, dizzy, confused, not really terribly pleasant, but tolerable (also I experienced a dry-mouth relievable by sipping on cold water throughout the rest of the night until I went to bed). I felt these symptoms increase with a slight hallucinogenic edge. Watching TV was a bit odd, things seemed a little distorted, textures were slightly enhanced or distorted. Nothing extreme. Around 12 hours later (midnight) I was thoroughly messed up (but not really hallucinating) and a bit tired. I decided I would go to bed, but instead of really sleeping I experienced more of a half-waking dream. The ‘dream’ consisted of rapidly changing rather random imagery of various things vaguely strung together in my brain’s half-assed attempt to make sense of it all.

The following morning I ‘awoke’ (meaning I felt as though I was only ever about half-asleep). I was dizzy as hell and could not coordinate myself very well. I experienced cotton-mouth and cotton-eyes, they were dry and itchy feeling. I had decided that my sinuses and uvula (that dangly thing in the throat) did not exist, which made my dry mouth much more tolerable. 🙂

That entire Saturday I felt bizarre, experiencing slightly tweaked vision, a strong headache, and all standard strong flu like symptoms excluding mucus and muscle-aches. (like a high fever) I didn’t have the presence of mind to actually check for a fever, I just assumed it was an effect. 4 or 5 hours after I woke up I decided that it was unpleasant and wanted it to end. I never got panicky about it, rather slightly impatient for the effects to end. “

Source: Erowin trip report on nutmeg: “Moderately Negative”

 


 

“This was a very interesting high. I remember parts of it very well, however other parts are very vague. Oh well. It was interesting. The positives of the drug were minimal other than a nice body buzz. It felt alright, nothing to write home about though. I got some other people to try this as a result of my use. They reported similar results.

The negatives of this drug outweighed the positives, in my opinion. The taste of the nutmeg is still terrible. Through my experiments on this day, I determined that eating it with mustard is the easiest way and I’ve yet to find anything better. The mustard’s cool, yet sharp taste masks the rancid flavour of the nutmeg quite well. “

Source: Erowid trip report on Nutmeg: Sleep Walking

My nutmeg trip report.

 


 

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Share your own trip report in the comment section below (to ensure anonymity don’t use your real name or real email address when submitting trip reports)!

Some of the information presented here might be outdated or incorrect (check “last updated” below). Make sure, that if you are planning to try out any of the substances to research them yourself as well.

I’m 100% committed to safe and responsible legal high consumption. If you have a few minutes to spare please read my blog post about responsible and safe legal drugs use.

 

Nutmeg is only one of the legal highs included in Simon’s legal high guide, check out the others as well.

If you are only interested in legal deliriant, then check out Simon’s Legal Deliriant Guide for more (coming soon).

Last updated: 2015. 11. 11.